On the Shelf

The African-American Child’s Heritage Cookbook

By Vanessa Roberts Parham

The African-American Child’s Heritage Cookbook by Vanessa Roberts Parham is the definitive guide to African-American cuisine. With more than 50 different recipes, spanning from Caribbean-influenced callaloo, right up to Southern gumbo, this cookbook is a must-have for chefs of all ages. The author shows that African-American cuisine encompasses all of American history. Tidbits augment each lesson, which help make this cookbook unique. For example, there is a recipe for succotash that is supplemented with an item to explain its indigenous origins. With clear and concise instructions, this cookbook is simple enough for children to understand, and it provides an excellent opportunity for them to discover the story behind favorite African- American dishes.

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The Cookbook for Children with Special Needs: Learning a Life Skill with Fun, Tasty, Healthy Recipes

By Deborah French

Written by Deborah French, a mother whose child has Down syndrome, The Cookbook for Children with Special Needs: Learning a Life Skill with Fun, Tasty, Healthy Recipes is attuned to the way children learn. Level one recipes feature easy, tasty versions of classics, such as loaded potatoes. Level two and three recipes up the ante and require more skill. Yet, even these recipes remain stunningly simple, thanks to the colorful pictures and intuitive instructions. This book cleverly builds upon skills, so your children can learn to juggle all aspects of cooking, and can then build their confidence by cooking their way through the recipes.

Addy’s Cookbook: A Peek at Dining in the Past With Meals You Can Cook Today

By Jodi Evert and Rebecca Sample Bernstein

If your child loves American Girls, they’re sure to love Addy’s Cookbook: A Peek at Dining in the Past With Meals You Can Cook Today by Jodi Evert and Rebecca Sample Bernstein. Based on the diet of Americans in the 1800s, Addy’s Cookbook includes delicious versions of historically accurate recipes. Because each recipe uses era-appropriate ingredients, you may find yourself searching for lard in your grocery store, but the resulting buttermilk biscuits are worth the effort. Each recipe includes a photograph of the final product along with helpful illustrations for each step, and each features details about life in the 1800s. The marginal notes make this book special and deliver learning opportunities for parents and children alike.

—Deborah E. McHamm, president and CEO, A Cultural Exchange